Reproductive Health in Missouri
I worked with a team of five other excellent journalists to produce a series of stories the state of Missouri's reproductive health resources. We covered the history of Missouri's reproductive health stances, current state legislation (HB 126), the lack of reproductive health education and racial disparities in health care. Each of the four stories contain: one Video and/or Audio piece, a text piece, a photo story, and a social element.
For parts 1 and 3, I was an editor, managing a team of 3 journalists. For parts 2 and 4, I was a producer.
PART 1:​​​​​​​
How the abortion ban is dividing Missourians
This is a "man on the street" style Instagram post to lead viewers to our main story. The reporters I oversaw questioned Columbia residents on how they feel their opinions are being represented.
This is the main audio piece. In this, we touch on the 8-week ban on abortion and how Missourians are divided on abortion legislation. Both anti-abortion and abortion rights groups believe they represent the Missouri population’s beliefs.  ​​​​​​​
For the infographic element, we highlighted the nation's history with reproductive rights in a timeline.
PART 2:​​​​​​​
Abortion ethics fuel debate across Missouri
Above is the social element, intended to tease the story on Facebook.
On August 27, 2019, a federal judge blocked the 8-week abortion ban in Missouri. But the debate about abortion continues. We explore the stories surrounding the debate in the above video piece.
The never-ending debate of abortion in Missouri has only become more polarizing and remains at a standstill. In this audio piece we take a look into the medical aspects of abortion and possible outcomes from undergoing the procedure.  ​​​​​​​
Carol Fick stands outside Planned Parenthood with other 40 Days for Life activists in Columbia, Mo., on Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. The organization puts the event together every year; the goal is to be a constant, peaceful presence at clinics in the hopes that they will end abortion according to their website.
Carol Fick stands outside Planned Parenthood with other 40 Days for Life activists in Columbia, Mo., on Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. The organization puts the event together every year; the goal is to be a constant, peaceful presence at clinics in the hopes that they will end abortion according to their website.
Carol Fick holds her rosary outside of Planned Parenthood in Columbia, Mo., on Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. The group held many signs like the one depicted outside of the clinic as a part of 40 Days for Life.
Carol Fick holds her rosary outside of Planned Parenthood in Columbia, Mo., on Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. The group held many signs like the one depicted outside of the clinic as a part of 40 Days for Life.
Yvonne Rottjakob reads her book in a lawn chair outside of Planned Parenthood in Columbia, Mo., on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. Entitled Padre Pio of Pietrelcina, the book is about the saint’s life, spirituality and gifts. A few of the older 40 Days for Life activists also brought lawn chairs as well to take breaks from standing on the sidewalk.
Yvonne Rottjakob reads her book in a lawn chair outside of Planned Parenthood in Columbia, Mo., on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. Entitled Padre Pio of Pietrelcina, the book is about the saint’s life, spirituality and gifts. A few of the older 40 Days for Life activists also brought lawn chairs as well to take breaks from standing on the sidewalk.
Sonia Potts holds up a sign on the sidewalk outside of Planned Parenthood as part of 40 Days for Life in Columbia, Mo., on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. Cars driving past on busy Providence Road can see the activists holding signs like these until 40 Days for Life ends on Nov. 3.
Sonia Potts holds up a sign on the sidewalk outside of Planned Parenthood as part of 40 Days for Life in Columbia, Mo., on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. Cars driving past on busy Providence Road can see the activists holding signs like these until 40 Days for Life ends on Nov. 3.
Kathy Forck, one of the leaders of Columbia’s 40 Days for Life, looks down at some chalking the Guild of Silly Heathens drew on the sidewalk in front of Planned Parenthood in Columbia, Mo., on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. “We started coming here on the day that they did abortions… we were able to speak to a few people, but for the most part it was silent prayer,” Forck said. The group started doing this in February of 2009, and Forck says they started participating in 40 Days for Life in September of 2009.
Kathy Forck, one of the leaders of Columbia’s 40 Days for Life, looks down at some chalking the Guild of Silly Heathens drew on the sidewalk in front of Planned Parenthood in Columbia, Mo., on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. “We started coming here on the day that they did abortions… we were able to speak to a few people, but for the most part it was silent prayer,” Forck said. The group started doing this in February of 2009, and Forck says they started participating in 40 Days for Life in September of 2009.
Here is the photo story, which covered "40 Days for Life," a protest against abortion. It took place in front of Planned Parenthood in Columbia, Mo. ​​​​​​​
PART 3:​​​​​​​
Let's not talk about sex: Missouri's abstinence only education
This is the social piece, intended for Facebook. It details the current state of Missouri's high school sex education.
This is the main audio piece- Sex education in Missouri is hard to come by. There are no rules for school curriculum on the subject, and the lack of preparation can lead to teen pregnancy. 
PART 4:​​​​​​​
Missouri Reproductive Health Disparities
This is the main audio piece. In this, we touch on the various disparities existing in Missouri's healthcare coverage.
Brittany Kellman explains why she began her organization, Jamaa Birth Village, in Ferguson, Mo., Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. “I was a teen mom, pregnant at 13, had my first son at 14, and I got treated like crap in the hospital...So all that really pissed me off me, man. But it encouraged me to study and learn more about alternatives,” she said. “I started Jamaa out of my home, which is here in Ferguson, about two minutes away from here.”
Brittany Kellman explains why she began her organization, Jamaa Birth Village, in Ferguson, Mo., Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. “I was a teen mom, pregnant at 13, had my first son at 14, and I got treated like crap in the hospital...So all that really pissed me off me, man. But it encouraged me to study and learn more about alternatives,” she said. “I started Jamaa out of my home, which is here in Ferguson, about two minutes away from here.”
Kellman lists off the services her organization provides to the women in her community in Ferguson, Mo., Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. “We provide peer to peer support for women who had depression and anxiety and if they need therapy and a mental health counselor,” she said.
Kellman lists off the services her organization provides to the women in her community in Ferguson, Mo., Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. “We provide peer to peer support for women who had depression and anxiety and if they need therapy and a mental health counselor,” she said.
Kellman shares the story behind a quilt gifted to her by a licensed Virginia CPM, in Ferguson, Mo., Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. “Due to racism and oppression in midwifery in Missouri, I had to travel [to Virginia] to complete my work in an apprenticeship that wasn’t racist,” she said.
Kellman shares the story behind a quilt gifted to her by a licensed Virginia CPM, in Ferguson, Mo., Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. “Due to racism and oppression in midwifery in Missouri, I had to travel [to Virginia] to complete my work in an apprenticeship that wasn’t racist,” she said.
Kellman holds a fetal doppler (left) and pinard horn (right), both of which are used to listen to a fetal heartbeat, in Ferguson, Mo., Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. “As community midwives, we’re typically holistic, so we only work with low risk findings, meaning, you're healthy, you don't have any issues and so we try to keep people healthy,” she said. “So the more and more I centered my life on holistic wellness, the more and more my passion came out.”
Kellman holds a fetal doppler (left) and pinard horn (right), both of which are used to listen to a fetal heartbeat, in Ferguson, Mo., Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. “As community midwives, we’re typically holistic, so we only work with low risk findings, meaning, you're healthy, you don't have any issues and so we try to keep people healthy,” she said. “So the more and more I centered my life on holistic wellness, the more and more my passion came out.”
Kellman describes how she started Jamaa Birthing Village, Ferguson, Mo., Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. “I got a vision to create a birthing village for us, by us, where women, whether they decided to have a baby or not have a baby, so even if they were just menstruating women, they could have a safe, comfortable place to come to be seen,” she said.
Kellman describes how she started Jamaa Birthing Village, Ferguson, Mo., Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. “I got a vision to create a birthing village for us, by us, where women, whether they decided to have a baby or not have a baby, so even if they were just menstruating women, they could have a safe, comfortable place to come to be seen,” she said.
Here is the photo story, about the only African American Certified Professional Midwife in Missouri.
For the infographic element, we highlighted the statistics  behind Missouri's health disparities.
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